Albania extends hunting ban by five years

<p> </p><p> </p><p> </p><p> </p><p> </p><p> </p><p> </p><p> </p><p> </p>
© Joachim Mahrholdt

Groundbreaking decision to protect migratory birds and wildlife

Press release, 3 June 2016

 

Radolfzell.  Yesterday the Albanian Parliament decided to extend the ban on hunting throughout the country for a further five years.  Despite the protests from hunters, the Ministry of Environment’s bill was passed with a small majority. The hunting ban will come into force with the publication of the law, which is expected to happen within the next two weeks.  The long overdue extension is the result of persistent pressure from both national and international nature protection organisations, including the Albanian partner organisations of the nature protection foundation, EuroNatur. In March 2014, the Albanian government first imposed a two-year moratorium on hunting throughout the country. The massive decline of wildlife in Albania triggered this action. 

“EuroNatur congratulates the Albanian government and Albanian parliament on this decision. The extension of the moratorium on hunting is groundbreaking and was an urgent necessity. Now, it is essential that the hunting ban is put into practice,” said Gabriel Schwaderer, the Executive Director of EuroNatur. Albanian wildlife levels are still catastrophically low. One of the reasons for this is that every year the wetlands and the remote areas of Albania’s Adriatic coastline become a death trap for hundreds of thousands of migratory birds.

“To change course, the Albanian government must impose the moratorium on hunting and press ahead with the comprehensive hunting reform that is already in process. This must include the monitoring of huntable species which complies with international standards.  Hunting quotas and lists of huntable species must no longer be pulled out of thin air. Establishing solid controls and punishing violations of the law is also essential,” said Thies Geertz.

Although the situation is still critical, the first positive effects of the hunting ban are being seen already. In 2015, commercial hunting tourism plummeted. Instead, the number of birdwatchers in attractive birdwatching areas such as the Karavasta Lagoon has risen. “The hunting ban has given the local population new sustainable sources of income. The challenge now is to move forward in this manner,” stated Thies Geertz.
 

Background Information:

 

For further information: EuroNatur, Konstanzer Str. 22, 78315 Radolfzell, Tel.: +49 7732 - 92 72 10,
Fax:+49 7732 - 92 72 22, E-Mail: info(at)euronatur.org, Contact person: Gabriel Schwaderer, Press Contact: Katharina Grund


This press release was translated by Alice Vernon-Clarke (volunteer of The Rosetta Foundation'sTranslation Commons).

How you can help

Donation

Future needs nature. EuroNatur cares for it. Please use your possibilities to help. With your donation you will make an effective contribution to a more livable environment.

Newsletter

Twice a month, EuroNatur provides you with the latest campaign and project information about Europe's natural heritage free of charge and at first hand.

News

A first for Croatia: a person appears in court accused of poisoning wild animals

At the beginning of the year there were several cases of wild and domestic animals being poisoned in Croatia. Now a 52-year old has appeared in court,...

Commune of Mals fights for agriculture without pesticides

++ South Tyrolean commune has been campaigning for a pesticide ban for six years ++ Insecticides, herbicides, etc. are putting the living conditions...

Fishes in Mediterranean region endangered due to hydropower boom

++ New study confirms: hydropower plants have a devastating impact on fish populations in rivers around the Mediterranean ++ Numerous species are...

Failure of lead ammunition ban caused by Julia Klöckner's ministry

The Europe-wide ban on hunting with lead ammunition failed to gain approval last week – due to opposition from the Federal Ministry of Food and...

Tackle illegal logging or face court, Commission warns Romanian Government

The European Commission has demanded today that Romanian authorities take immediate action to stop illegal logging of old-growth and primary forests...

More than 122,000 people are demanding the protection of the Romanian virgin forests

++ A petition with more than 122,000 signatures has been handed to two State Secretaries of Romania’s environment minister ++ Demand for comprehensive...

Success for nature conservation: construction freeze for hydropower projects

++ Parliament imposes historic decision for rivers in Bosnia & Herzegovina ++

Triumph for European rivers

The European Water Framework Directive is to be kept in its current form. This has been confirmed by Virginijus Sinkevičius, EU Commissioner for the...

Ulcinj Salina: One year of nature conservation - few things happened

One year ago, Ulcinj Salina was designated as a nature reserve – a great success for us and our partners. While it sounds good on paper, in practice...

Boom in illegal trade in animals in Albania

Despite a ban on hunting, numerous wild animals are being killed or traded in Albania; stuffed Balkan lynx, brown bears in cages, wild game on the...

The "Brave Women of Kruščica" must fight again

In Bosnia and Herzegovina, the women residents of the village of Kruščica are once again preparing to blockade their river. Investors have announced...

Artists speak up for Balkan Rivers

++ On the occasion of the World Music Day on 21 June 40 artists support the Blue Heart campaign for the protection of Balkan Rivers ++

Pesticides: No thanks! The EuroNatur award to the commune of Mals

++ The EuroNatur award 2020 goes to the commune of Mals in South Tyrol ++ It has gained national prominence through its campaign to ban pesticides in...

At long last a clear statement: EuroNatur welcomes the biodiversity strategy for the EU

++ European Commission presents biodiversity strategy ++ In future 10% of the land surface area should be placed under strict protection ++ To...

Europe's largest river protection area on the verge of gaining approval

Europe's largest river protection area could soon be created along three rivers - the Danube, the Drava and the Mur. On 7 May, after also receiving...

By using our services, you agree that we use cookies. Data protection