Nature Conservation Policy in Europe

Dactylorhiza incarnata in Töpchin Natura2000 area Dactylorhiza incarnata in Töpchin Natura2000 area
The NATURA 2000 network is the world's
biggest transboundary network of protected areas.
© Manuela Burkart

EuroNatur: Advocate for a better nature conservation policy

Ever since its inception, EuroNatur’s work has had a European focus. The protection of Europe’s rivers and forests, its wildlife and its birds, has to be driven forward through direct political interaction with decision-makers in Brussels. This was one of the reasons why, in 2021, we decided to open a branch office in the Belgian capital.

In our campaigns, we set regional priorities - such as the Ulcinj Salina in Montenegro or the primary and old-growth forests of the Romanian Carpathians - and our aim is to bring about positive change through public and political pressure.

EU funds should never harm nature, climate or the environment (Statement of the Green 10 on the ‘do no significant harm’ principle, 18.11.2021)

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EuroNatur Position Paper on energy generation without destroying nature (30.11.2021)

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What we are doing to secure an ecologically-oriented nature conservation policy

Forest activists

Protest action in front of the European Parliament to protect the Romanian virgin forests.

© Matthias Schickhofer
Lonsjko polje in Croatia

Traditional grazing livestock farming in the Sava floodplains.

© Gunther Willinger
  • Campaigning together for Europe's natural heritage: Together with our partners, we are working to expose abuses of nature conservation policy. We provide early warning of undesirable ecological developments in Europe, and we mobilise the public as well as EU bodies and Members of the European Parliament. We organise protests - whether in Brussels or locally in our project areas - and take legal action where appropriate. 
     
  • Reforming agriculture, preserving traditional farming methods: The way we produce our food is key to species diversity in Europe. At one time, forms of small-scale agriculture in particular, ensured that Europe’s biodiversity boomed. EuroNatur is therefore supporting agricultural projects such as pastoral livestock farming (transhumance) in the Iberian Peninsula and the Balkans. Entire ecosystems, such as those which support the dung beetle, the orchid and the black vulture, are benefiting from this approach. A reformed agricultural policy can contribute not only to nature conservation and environmental protection, but also to improving the social conditions of many farmers.
  • Deploying funds appropriately: In response to the COVID-19 crisis, the European Union has decided to invest around 670 billion euros in the reconstruction of the European economy. The money is linked to investments in climate and nature conservation as well as digitalisation. However, many of the measures planned by member states risk being extremely damaging to nature. EuroNatur is campaigning to limit the worst impacts of this misguided policy and to set the course for an ecological future.

Setting the right rules is how society can function together with nature and if politicians are not acting for the greater good, it is our role as EuroNatur, together with other civil societies, to speak up.

Bruna Campos Bruna Campos, Senior EU Policy Manager at EuroNatur
How you can help
Donation

Future needs nature. EuroNatur cares for it. Please use your possibilities to help. With your donation you will make an effective contribution to a more livable environment.

Sustaining membership

EuroNatur focuses on long-term nature conservation projects instead of quick fixes. With your regular donations, you give us the planning security we need.

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